Your Questions About Is It Smart To Invest In Gold

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Daniel asks…

Who should be responsible for paying?

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me! 🙂
Basically, I am wondering if my boyfriend is being cheap or just legitimately doesn’t know how to “treat” a girl, or if it‘s a cultural thing, or if I’m being too demanding. We have been dating for 6 months, and have been friends for awhile, and best friends for the past year or so. We have been doing long distance for three months now (he’s in england, I’m in america). During our relationship we have been on only a few “dates”, however we have always split the check or bill and he has never bought me a drink while we’re out or offered to do so. I’m usually fine with that, however it bugs me a bit he has not once offered to take me out and pay, or even just offer to pay. Right now, I feel like I am investing more financially in the relationship than he is. I have visited him once to surprise him on his birthday (a $1,200 plane ticket) and have bought another $1,200 plane ticket for a trip in june for a formal ball at his university. The thing is, on top of the plane ticket price, he is expecting me to pay for my ticket to the ball, which exceeds $200 for my share of the ticket (not to mention the cost of buying an appropriate ball gown and shoes). He is also keeping a tab of how much I owe him when I arrive in June for other costs, such as a t-shirt he has bought me, alcohol he bought at the store the other day for my trip, etc. I am usually all for independent women and keeping relationships equal, but I feel so disappointed and cheated, and like he’s not a normal boyfriend stepping up to the plate and taking care of his girlfriend. We are both college students, so I understand we can’t live fabulous, extravagant lifestyles, but the fact he is “charging” me for this ticket really rubs me the wrong way. I have spent so much on him, and I am sacrificing quite a bit to be able to see him in June, and he hasn’t even offered to pay for the ticket, let alone a drink or two while we’re out. He has a high-paying government research job during the summers, while I am unemployed. We are doing long distance right now due to my financial issues.

We’re madly in love, he is moving to america to be with me after he gets his degree, and he has brought up the subject of marriage on multiple occasions. He’s fantastic in every other way, he is very affectionate and smart and kind. But his unwillingness to pay for anything is beginning to cloud the things I love about him. Am I being unreasonable here? I’d hate to sound like a gold digger, so how would I even broach this subject with him?

Thank you so much for any help, I’m honestly at a loss here! 🙁
This isn’t something worth breaking up over, but I could see how it could become that way in the future.
At this point we do plan to get married eventually, have children, etc. So what should I expect for our lives together if he’s cheap now?

Also, the last thing I want to do is come off sounding like a selfish *****. How do I even start this sort of conversation?! I don’t want him to think I am using him or trying to take advantage of him, and I really don’t want to hurt his feelings.

Justin answers:

Well, i think that is going a bit over the top, and i think a guy should offer to pay somethings. I he invited you to the ball, then he should pay for the ticket to get in. Just like at a prom here.
If you guys get married, how with financial situation work there?
I would talk to him about though, and here his side of the story too.

Steven asks…

FINANCIAL LITERACY-lessn 1-2?

1)How did the colonists pay for the things they needed?

2) What is a shortcoming of bartering?
A.) The person may not want what you are using to barter.
B.) Hard to figure out what something is worth.
C.) Both A and B
D.) None of the above

3) What is money?
A.) a medium of exchange
B.) a standard for measuring the value of something
C.) a store of value saved for later purchases
D.) all of the above

4) What is the real value of money?
A.) gold and silver
B.) purchasing power
C.) standard of living
D.) none of the above

5) When prices are inflated _____.
A.) your money buys more than it did
B.) your money buys less than it did

6)How do banks create money?
A.) by borrowing it
B.) by printing it
C.) by lending it

7) Keeping prices stable is the job of _____.
A.) Federal Reserve
B.) Congress
C.) U.S. Bank
D.) Both A and B

8)Too much money in the economy causes _____.
A.) inflation
B.) depression

9)Which of the following is not true of the Federal Reserve?
A.) helps regulate and supervise banks
B.) controls the money supply to help the economy grow without inflation
C.) is funded by Congress

10)If you inherited $20,000 what would you do with it? Explain.
________________________________________________________________________________
lesson 2
_____________________
How Values Affect Financial Planning
If helpfulness is one of your top values, giving money to charity might be part of your financial plan. If you value freedom and adventure, you might want to plan to have enough money to travel and do things you want to do. If family is one of your top values, you need to plan to have secure employment that provides for the needs of your family. If you value wealth, you are going to need a financial plan that includes investing. What about you? How will your values affect how you plan for the future……..
_________________________________________________________________________________

1) Based on the Forced Values Test, list your top three values.

2) Based on the Forced Values Test, list your bottom three values.

3) Do you agree with the results of this test? Why or why not?

4) Choose one of your top values and explain how that value could affect your financial plan. Type the name of the value and then type an explanation.
_________________________________________________________________________________

Keith a junior in high school want to work in costruction aftr he graduates high school. In order to get a good job he has to attend a 2-year technical school. his parents will pay for his tuition if he can save $2,000.00 by the end of his senior year.he doesnt have a job right nobut he wants to get a part-time job.
_____________________________________________________________________

14) Type a long-term goal for Keith.

15) Type a short-term goal for Keith.

16) Type another short-term goal for Keith.

17) Explain how one of the goals you wrote for Keith applies one of the following points of the SMART system: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic or time-bound.

Justin answers:

Ah… Financial Illiteracy Class chapter 1.2

Answer… Read each question carefully and choose the right answer. After all… You did pay attention in class and did your home work, right?

If that does not help… Then do what comes easy: Drop out of school, work minimum wage and forever live at or below the poverty level because you didn’t find the time to sit down and do your homework.

You know what is really sad? That this stuff is so easy that most of us can get it right on the first run and we haven’t been sitting in a class room in decades. Have some dignity and take this question down…. Right now you make your peers look really, really dumb.

John asks…

What do you think of my friend Joe the Statist?

Joe gets up at 6:00am to prepare his morning coffee. He makes it with a machine he could not possibly have made himself. He does not know where it was made, or how it works, and may not care. He does not know the people that planted, cultivated, harvested, dried, roasted, packaged, freighted, warehoused, distributed, marketed, or retailed his coffee, and may not care. The company that insures the manufacturer of the coffee machine required that it meet certain safety guidelines, as established by the private insurance-company-funded Underwriters Laboratory. Joe has seen the UL mark, but is not really sure what it’s for or how it protects him. He doesn’t clearly understand why greedy businessmen might be interested in a safe product. All of this was made possible by libertarians who fought for and won the legal right to free trade.

He fills his pot full of good clean drinking water which he bought from Ozarka, because the local government monopoly of water supply bears the comforting designation of “accepted” and also tastes funny.

He thinks back to going to church on Sunday. He is happy to have a community where he can participate with other like-minded people in ceremony. This was made possible by the long struggle to disentangle church and state, and his church enjoys the absence of taxation. He wishes other aspects of his life could be so free.

He takes his daily medication with his first swallow of coffee, and then he takes a long drag on a cigarette. He bought his medication while on a trip to Mexico, where, thanks to less regulation and looser enforcement of IP laws, they were much cheaper. His medications are safe to take because he bought them from a reputable dealer. He can still afford cigarettes and can still legally purchase them, because of those who continue to fight for his rights, even if his exercise of those rights might harm him or his family.

Joe takes his morning shower reaching for his shampoo; it is fragranced with some sort of exotic flower and there are strange chemicals in it – god knows what – and he bought it, well, because he liked the picture of the kangaroo on the bottle. He luxuriates in his bourgeois moment in the shower, a luxury unavailable to even the most wealthy of only 200 years ago. He is able to have many of such seemingly simple luxuries because some greedy businessmen sought enormous profits in the only way they could: satisfying consumer demand.

Joe begins his work day; he has a good job with excellent pay, medicals benefits, retirement, paid holidays and vacation because the accumulation of capital over centuries has now brought the discounted marginal value product of a schmuck like Joe to unimaginable heights. Joe doesn’t know anything about economics because he doesn’t have to. He is no smarter than his forbears, and he works less. Nonetheless, because he participates in a world-embracing division of labor where his specialized work on a growing capital base is greatly valued, he is richer.

Joe’s employer pays these standards because if they don’t, his employer’s competitors will.

It’s noon time. Joe doesn’t need to make a Bank Deposit so he can pay some bills – he uses online banking and direct deposit. He has no idea how these systems work, or what a banking clearinghouse is, but he is able to use these services at the lowest cost practicable because banks compete for his business. Notwithstanding the massive interventions to the business of banking, such as the creation of central banking and the Federal Reserve system and the repudiation of the gold standard, he is able to weather the government-induced business cycles and inflation by investing in mutual funds, annuities, stocks, bonds, REITs, real estate, precious metals, and other investment vehicles. He is able to do this because of greedy entrepreneurs and libertarians who fought against usury laws.

The online banking leaves him free to take a moment to browse amazon.com for his favorite books, movies, and music.

Joe is home from work. He plans to visit his father this evening at his farm home in the country. He gets in his car for the drive to dad’s; his car is not among the safest in the world because he chose not to buy a Volvo. His brother has a Volvo, but he has a gas-guzzling muscle car. He has this choice because nationalization of the auto industry was prevented.

He arrives at his rural boyhood home. The house didn’t have any good programming choices until DirecTV offered an array of programming and high-speed Internet, too. His dad uses a VCR, which only became affordable to him after lots of rich people bought the early, expensive versions and the manufacturers improved the designs and cut costs. In fact, his dad has a cell phone, TiVo, refrigerator, microwave oven, and a CD player – all of which became affordable to him because they were first the toys of the super-rich, and the crackpot schemes financed by the wealthy entrepreneurs willing an

Justin answers:

I think Joe has quite the good life. I feel bad that socialsts are trying to ruin the lives of good people like Joe with over regulation, taxes, and nanny state tactics. All of us “Joes” need to stand up together and fight the power and in November vote out all the lifelong politicians that are running (and ruining) the country.

Paul asks…

You’ve heard of “Conservative Joe”, but have you heard of Statist Joe?

By Gill Guillory

Joe gets up at 6:00am to prepare his morning coffee. He makes it with a machine he could not possibly have made himself. He does not know where it was made, or how it works, and may not care. He does not know the people that planted, cultivated, harvested, dried, roasted, packaged, freighted, warehoused, distributed, marketed, or retailed his coffee, and may not care. The company that insures the manufacturer of the coffee machine required that it meet certain safety guidelines, as established by the private insurance-company-funded Underwriters Laboratory. Joe has seen the UL mark, but is not really sure what it’s for or how it protects him. He doesn’t clearly understand why greedy businessmen might be interested in a safe product. All of this was made possible by libertarians who fought for and won the legal right to free trade.

He fills his pot full of good clean drinking water which he bought from Ozarka, because the local government monopoly of water supply bears the comforting designation of “accepted” and also tastes funny.

He thinks back to going to church on Sunday. He is happy to have a community where he can participate with other like-minded people in ceremony. This was made possible by the long struggle to disentangle church and state, and his church enjoys the absence of taxation. He wishes other aspects of his life could be so free.

He takes his daily medication with his first swallow of coffee, and then he takes a long drag on a cigarette. He bought his medication while on a trip to Mexico, where, thanks to less regulation and looser enforcement of IP laws, they were much cheaper. His medications are safe to take because he bought them from a reputable dealer. He can still afford cigarettes and can still legally purchase them, because of those who continue to fight for his rights, even if his exercise of those rights might harm him or his family.

Joe takes his morning shower reaching for his shampoo; it is fragranced with some sort of exotic flower and there are strange chemicals in it – god knows what – and he bought it, well, because he liked the picture of the kangaroo on the bottle. He luxuriates in his bourgeois moment in the shower, a luxury unavailable to even the most wealthy of only 200 years ago. He is able to have many of such seemingly simple luxuries because some greedy businessmen sought enormous profits in the only way they could: satisfying consumer demand.

Joe begins his work day; he has a good job with excellent pay, medicals benefits, retirement, paid holidays and vacation because the accumulation of capital over centuries has now brought the discounted marginal value product of a schmuck like Joe to unimaginable heights. Joe doesn’t know anything about economics because he doesn’t have to. He is no smarter than his forbears, and he works less. Nonetheless, because he participates in a world-embracing division of labor where his specialized work on a growing capital base is greatly valued, he is richer.

Joe’s employer pays these standards because if they don’t, his employer’s competitors will.

It’s noon time. Joe doesn’t need to make a Bank Deposit so he can pay some bills – he uses online banking and direct deposit. He has no idea how these systems work, or what a banking clearinghouse is, but he is able to use these services at the lowest cost practicable because banks compete for his business. Notwithstanding the massive interventions to the business of banking, such as the creation of central banking and the Federal Reserve system and the repudiation of the gold standard, he is able to weather the government-induced business cycles and inflation by investing in mutual funds, annuities, stocks, bonds, REITs, real estate, precious metals, and other investment vehicles. He is able to do this because of greedy entrepreneurs and libertarians who fought against usury laws.

The online banking leaves him free to take a moment to browse amazon.com for his favorite books, movies, and music.

Joe is home from work. He plans to visit his father this evening at his farm home in the country. He gets in his car for the drive to dad’s; his car is not among the safest in the world because he chose not to buy a Volvo. His brother has a Volvo, but he has a gas-guzzling muscle car. He has this choice because nationalization of the auto industry was prevented.

He arrives at his rural boyhood home. The house didn’t have any good programming choices until DirecTV offered an array of programming and high-speed Internet, too. His dad uses a VCR, which only became affordable to him after lots of rich people bought the early, expensive versions and the manufacturers improved the designs and cut costs. In fact, his dad has a cell phone, TiVo, refrigerator, microwave oven, and a CD player – all of which became affordable to him because they were first the toys of the super-rich, and the crackpot schemes financed by the wealthy ent
entrepreneurs willing and able to risk their money in such endeavors.

He is happy to see his dad who is now retired. His dad lives on a reverse mortgage – a recent market innovation. After his visit with dad he gets back in his car for the ride home. He turns on a radio talk show. The host keeps saying that libertarians are kooks and anarchists and thank God for continual market intervention and government protection. Government intervention and taxation improves and will continue to improve the standards of living of Americans. (He doesn’t tell Joe that his beloved Democrats/Republicans have fought to destroy every protection and benefit Joe enjoys throughout his day.)

Joe agrees, and puts his support behind protectionism, taxation, monopolies, interventionism, and war: these are obviously the things upon which civilization is built.
Sorry for accidentally cutting the ending off charlie.

Justin answers:

I haven’t heard of that–but it’s so true! Excellent article.

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