Your Questions About Investing In Foreign Coins

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John asks…

What are the reasons to invest property in Brazil?

Justin answers:

Why Brazil

Low Prices
Brazil and the Bahia region in particular ofers excellent prices in a beautiful idyllic setting – property can be anything up to half the price of Spain, and is cheaper than the Caribbean. Construction costs are much cheaper too.
Booming tourism
Foreign tourism is developing fast. Internet travel company Opodo has predicted that Brazil will be one of the top emerging destinations in 2007. From 2007 – 2014, tourism is set to grow at 4.3% per annum. (source WTTC).
Solid economic future
Te BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) have all, in recent years, taken steps to reform their political and economic systems in order to compete in the world economy. Te term “BRIC” was originally coined in a 2003 paper by Goldman Sachs, which predicted that this group of countries has the potential to become economically stronger than the current richest countries in the world by 2050. Increasing wealth amongst the population will increase demand for property and push up prices.
No restrictions on Property ownership
Tere are no restrictions on foreign ownership as the government is keen to encourage inward foreign investment. All property in Brazil is freehold.
Local Mortgage Market expanding
Falling interest rates and increasingly accessible mortgages will push up property prices. According to Te Daily Telegraph (13/01/07), only 22% of the population have fnanced their property with a mortgage, compared to 70% in Europe and USA. As banks diversify and develop their mortgage products, the market will grow, and the knock-on efect will be increasing demand for property.
Government economic improvments
President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, popularly known as Lula, was elected for a second term in October 2006 with a strong agenda of economic reform and improvement. Under his government, interest rates have dropped to 15.75% from 26.5% in 2003. He is also working to bring down infation – it is currently at 5% after reaching a dizzying 2,500% in 1993. While these fgures may still seem high to us, the improvement within Brazil is enormous.
Getting in early
Brazil’s property market is in early stages of development which means there is lots of room for growth, balanced by the government’s stated policy of “high-priority sustainable development”. Additionally, with the pound strong, UK investors have increased buying power there.
The beautiful People
Anyone who has been to Brazil or who has encountered Brazilians will tell you how passionate, energetic and friendly they are – they embrace a love of life and love a party – their carnivals are renowned the world over! Tey are passionate about life, football, music and food – their heartfelt belief is that life is there to be enjoyed!
Low cost of living
Te cost of living in Brazil can be as little as 20% of that of the UK. Tis means that it is possible to enjoy high standards at relatively low cost.
Increased local buying power
Recent economic growth, the government’s fscal improvements and growing fnancial confdence have meant that Brazilians are becoming increasingly well-of. Tey have increased buying power and as mentioned, their mortgage market is set to expand and grow. Brazilians love their country and are waking up to the possibilities of investment property ownership. Tey are eager to invest in high quality developments for second homes and holiday homes. City-dwellers in particular aspire to owning somewhere they can escape the noise, trafc and mayhem of the big cities of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.

Steven asks…

I want to trade with coins, but to get intrest too on my holding, how do i do it?

I want 20% of my portfolio to be held directly in foreign coins, but i dont want it to be static, but to get intrest rate on my holdings
i dont know any tool that can give me that, except bonds issued by countries, if there is such, please let me know, and in any case, how do i buy those bonds, for example, if i want to buy colombian bonds issued by the goverment, how do i do it?
thanks alot in advance
by coins, i dont mean old coins, but foreign currency, thanks 🙂

Justin answers:

Trading foreign currency is not done with foreign coins.

To trade in foreign currency, you buy options on millions of, whatever currency you particularly like.

For $5,000, you can probably control more than $1,000,000 of foreign currency. So the leverage is fantastic.

But if you don’t know what you are doing (Coins?) you will lose a lot of money real fast,
Stay away from “Forex” until you have had tens of years of investing experience and are really understanding of markets and what affects them.

Charles asks…

I wanted to invest in unique ventures such as valuble art?Anyone have any other ideas?

Justin answers:

First of all – why??

Why art or other exotic or offbeat stuff? Do you have any expertise to evaluate the advice you might get? Are you really expecting a return on your investment?

As mentioned, art is rather risky and should only be bought if you like the piece and have a *lot* of money (you aren’t even eligible to buy some investments unless you have more than $1/4 – 1/2 million available).

On the other hand, old masters have appreciated greatly recently. See Southeby’s or the ‘Fine Art Fund’ (ref 1) or the Artist Pension Trust as examples – not recommendations.

(BTW, had you heard how Steve Wynn put a hole in his $139 million dollar Picasso?)

Anyhow, there are lots of other odd things to invest in like venture capital [not too odd but risky],
coins,
comics,
trading cards,
stamps,
micro-loans (not bad and it helps people),
cars,
whole businesses,
casinos,
foreign businesses,
etc

Write to discuss if you like.

George asks…

Where should I put my money?

Right now I’ve got about $1500, some foreign money, and a few gold and sliver coins. Disregard college funding; that’s going to be left to my summer job and family help.

If I just want to make this stuff have the greatest amount of buying power in the future, what should I invest in?

Justin answers:

If you do go the CD route, as some have suggested above, consider taking advantage of Patelco’s current promotion and putting $1000 of it towards a 7% 1-year CD.

Https://www.patelco.org/accounts/certificates.aspx

You can probably find a good CD for the remaining $500 in this thread on fatwallet.com about the best current CD rates:

http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/finance/682884/

Mark asks…

Algebra is too hard for me can anyone help me complete it ?

Question 37 2 points Save
Solve.

Mary and her brother John collect foreign coins. Mary has three times the number of coins that John has. Together they have 140 foreign coins. Find how many coins Mary has.
Question 37 answers
21 coins
35 coins
98 coins
105 coins

Question 38 text Question 38 2 points Save
Solve.

Six times a number, added to -63, is -105. Find the number.
Question 38 answers
-42
-252
-7
7

Question 39 text Question 39 2 points Save
Solve the inequality. Graph the solution set and write it in interval notation.

14x – 6 2(6x – 11)
Question 39 answers
(-, -8]
(-, -8)
[-8, )
(-8, )

Question 40 text Question 40 2 points Save
Solve the inequality. Graph the solution set and write it in interval notation.

35x + 30 > 5(6x + 7)
Question 40 answers
[1, )
(-, 1)
(1, )
(-, 1]

Question 41 text Question 41 2 points Save
Graph the inequality on a number line. Then write the solution in interval notation.

-4 < x < 0
Question 41 answers

[-4, 0)

(-4, 0)

[-4, 0]

(-4, 0]

Question 42 text Question 42 2 points Save
Solve.

Attendance this year at the homecoming football game is 174% of what it was last year. If last year's homecoming football game attendance was 33,000, what is this year's attendance? (Round to the nearest integer, if necessary.)
Question 42 answers
574,200 people
57,420 people
190 people
5273 people

Question 43 text Question 43 2 points Save
Solve.

A chemist needs 130 milliliters of a 75% solution but has only 43% and 95% solutions available. Find how many milliliters of each that should be mixed to get the desired solution.
Question 43 answers
70 ml of 43%; 60 ml of 95%
60 ml of 43%; 70 ml of 95%
80 ml of 43%; 50 ml of 95%
50 ml of 43%; 80 ml of 95%

Question 44 text Question 44 2 points Save
Solve.

A chemist needs 70 milliliters of a 69% solution but has only 60% and 81% solutions available. Find how many milliliters of each that should be mixed to get the desired solution.
Question 44 answers
40 ml of 60%; 30 ml of 81%
30 ml of 60%; 40 ml of 81%
50 ml of 60%; 20 ml of 81%
20 ml of 60%; 50 ml of 81%

Question 45 text Question 45 2 points Save
Substitute the given values into the formula and solve for the unknown variable.

V = Bh; V = 63, h = 7
Question 45 answers
70
27
441
9

Question 46 text Question 46 2 points Save
Graph the set of numbers given in interval notation. Then write an inequality statement in x describing the numbers graphed.

[-3, )
Question 46 answers

x -3

x -3

Question 47 text Question 47 2 points Save
Solve.

Jeans are on sale at the local department store for 30% off. If the jeans originally cost $57, find the sale price. (Round to the nearest cent.)
Question 47 answers
$39.90
$55.29
$74.10
$17.10

Question 48 text Question 48 2 points Save
Solve.

The difference of triple a number and is equal to the sum of the number and . Find the number.
Question 48 answers

Question 49 text Question 49 2 points Save
Substitute the given values into the formula and solve for the unknown variable.

V = Bh; V = 12, h = 2
Question 49 answers
18
24
6
14

Question 50 text Question 50 2 points Save
Solve.

Kevin invested part of his $10,000 bonus in a certificate of deposit that paid 6% annual simple interest, and the remainder in a mutual fund that paid 11% annual simple interest. If his total interest for that year was $700, how much did Kevin invest in the mutual fund?
Question 50 answers
$8000
$1000
$2000
$3000

Justin answers:

Maan this is loong!!

Anyway:
1. Let x be john
3x be mary

so: x + 3x = 140 coins

simplify:
4x = 140
divide by 4
x = 35.

2. Let number =x
so
6x + (-63) = -105
6x = -105 + 63
6x = -42
divide by 6:
x = -7

3.
14x – 6 = 2(6x – 11)

14x – 12x = -22 + 6
2x = -16
x = -8

4.
35x + 30 > 5(6x + 7)
35x + 30 > 30x + 35
35x – 30x > 35- 30
5x = 5
x = 1

5.
Cant show the graph here
but the line should be above -4 and doesnt reach 0

6. Let last year = x
this year = x + .74x
so:
x = 33000
33000 + .074(33000)
it will be:
57,420..

William asks…

Is it against ANY law to refuse pennies/coins?

for a store owner/cashier to verbally refuse service to me if i choose to pay in coins, namely pennies? If its on camera can i sue? (CVS)

i needed to buy some pampers and all i had was my coin jar, i could have stopped at commerce bank but my childs pampers were of the essence.
i even offerd to count them.
it was lilke 7 bucks rolled up pennies and $14 in random change, i needed the pampers badly!

Justin answers:

There are a number of opinions expressed here that CVS wasn’t legally required to accept pennies or other coins in payment for the Pampers you were wishing to buy. They’re correct, but what’s missing from those opinions is the authority for those opinions.

Here it is, in the form of a US Treasury Department opinion expressed on the relevant section of the United States Code.

It isn’t that pennies and other coins aren’t “legal tender” – they are – but rather what those words mean in terms of a merchant’s obligations:

http://www.snopes.com/business/money/pennies.asp

“Title 31 (Money and Finance), Subtitle IV (Money), Chapter 51 (Coins and Currency), Subchapter I (Monetary System), Section 5103 (Legal Tender) of the United States Code states:
‘United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues. Foreign gold or silver coins are not legal tender for debts.'”

“What this statute means, in the words of the United States Treasury, is that ‘[A]ll United States money . . . Is a valid and legal offer [that’s the key word here – Aron R] of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal law mandating that a person or organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services.'”

“That’s it. All this means is that the Federal Reserve System must honor U.S. Currency and coins, not necessarily anyone else. U.S. Currency and coins can be used for making payments, but merchants do not necessarily have to accept it for all forms of business transactions.”

So what this CVS cashier did wasn’t illegal. Nonetheless, in my opinion, it was scummy of the cashier not to accept coins. Any cashier with reasonable customer service skills should have found a way to accommodate you. One option is that they do so by asking that you carry out the transaction at a customer service counter, so as to lessen the inconvenience for other customers who might be waiting at the regular checkout lines. But they could have found a way.

Complaining to CVS headquarters might be a good idea. But suing them isn’t. We live in a sue-happy society, and despite how strongly you feel about how you were treated, it wasn’t illegal. Your best course might be to let CVS higher-ups know how you felt, and how their employees’ treatment of you affected your family life, its impact on your child or children who badly needed the diapers that day, etc.

You could point out that in today’s economy, many families are hurting and will occasionally need to buy essentials, like diapers and food, with small change. Even families that are doing OK may occasionally only have that means of payment. CVS staff should be aware of that and find ways to serve their customers with respect.

In your communications with the company, it is also useful to be clear about what you are asking for: An apology? A refund, or coupons, or some other form of renumeration for your treatment? (You can decide whether it’s better to be up-front about this, or simply let them take the initiative.) Some promise of a) guidance to employees about how to handle purchases made with lots of coins and/or b) employee training around this topic, either chain-wide or at your local store? The latter would seem to be one of the most important outcomes, as it would help ensure that you and others aren’t again treated in the way you were that day.

Some contact info:

Names of executive officers of the parent company that owns the CVS drugstores, CVS Caremark Corporation:
http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/people/people.asp?symbol=CVS

Contact info for the executive officers:
http://www.cvscaremark.com/our-company/contact-us
(see under “Corporate Contacts”, near the bottom of that page)

General contact info for the drugstore part of the company, CVS/Pharmacy. Even if you write one of the executive officers, be sure to also write – or cc – the customer service managers here:
http://www.cvscaremark.com/our-company/contact-us
(see under “CVS/Pharmacy Customer Service”, the second main heading on that page)

You might also consider writing about your experience – ideally after CVS management and/or customer service management has had a chance to respond, so you can tell the whole story from problem to resolution, if any – on one of the complaint boards such as:

http://www.my3cents.com/search.cgi?criteria=CVS

http://www.complaintsboard.com/?search=cvs

and others you can find through a search on Yahoo, Google, etc.

Donald asks…

Will the appreciating PESO be appreciated?

When the PESO reaches Php 35.00, or less will this value be appreciated by the Filipinos?
thanks for the answers….

would it mean that the PESO should stay in the high Php 50 or even higher for the 10million OFWs and Immigrants? How about the rest of the 80million folks left behind?

How will you appreciate a strong peso? Or do you prefer a weak one?

Justin answers:

For some, yes. For others who depend on the high exchange rate of the US dollar, no. There are two sides of a coin and the issue of the peso appreciating in value against the US dollar has the same theory. No one is more pleased with the decline of the US dollar than the importers and the jetsetters. And no one is more disturbed and anxious with this event than the OFWs and their families, the exporters and the foreign investors who invested in the country like for example call centers.

Ken asks…

Do you think that this will be known as the Great Panic of ’08?

In historical context, think of the long depression era of 1876 – 1896, the panic of 1907, and the Bank Panic of 1932.

Justin answers:

No, I think this will be known as the Pandemic of ’08. More banks will fail. The bailout of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac puts us in disfavor of international investors. We basically switched their sound investments in US backed Treasuries for junk bonds. If they had wanted to invest in those mortgage buyers, they would have, but they bought Treasuries, which are now getting less valuable. The AIG bailout sets a dangerous trend– we can not bailout unscrupulous companies with unsound management. No one’s insurance policies were at stake, just shareholders investments…ANY market interference causes problems down the road. Banks are now hoarding money, afraid to make new loans at ANY rate, since no one is willing to invest in them, they are doing what they can to maintain some liquidity. The Street.com has a list of problem banks and their ratings, and Dr. Martin Weiss of Money and Markets took it one step further and figured in derivatives to show what banks to avoid. Get your money to safety, then use inverse ETFs to hedge against investments you can not touch, for whatever reason. Dr. Weiss and his colleagues predicted these events, and are on the mark about the future (See their “Plague to Pandemic” video to see how the Wall Stree and bank failures will ripple through the retail sector, affecting companies such as Intel and Google even. No, we’re far beyond just a mere “Panic”….when foreign investors stop funding our Unconstitutional wars and deficit spending habits, no matter how much money we print up, we will be, in essence, bankrupt. I don’t suggest anyone put dollars in a safe at home and think their money is safe….convert it to Gold coins first, and you may be OK. Many people will come out of this richer than before with prudent investing, and with the right information, YOU could be one of them.

Joseph asks…

Trade antique foreign GOLD COINS for income?

Can foreign minted Antique gold coins be traded for income? If so how? Like stocks?Daily? Weekly? Monthly? Thanks

Justin answers:

It can be traded for cash, but not income. The only way it could be traded for income is if you found a buyer and you were willing to let him pay you for the coins over time but that’s not what you are thinking of I presume.

FYI: Gold is one of the riskiest ways to invest and should only be left to professionals and they too can lose big-time.

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