Your Questions About Storing Junk Silver Coins

Robert asks…

The value of silver coins on the rise?

I’ve been studying market conditions and trends with old u.s. currency, and believe that the values of old u.s. silver is bound to rise. Not so much with the morgan silver dollars, but I predict draped and bust halves for example will sky rocket in the higher grades. Any opinions greatly appreciated.

Justin answers:

The flowing hair and draped bust 1/2 dollar already command very high prices in top grades that have great strikes and eye appeal. They sell for much more than book value or trends values. There is all a large following for Capped Bust 1/2 dollars with many collecting by die variety. Good quality coins do not last long on the market and go for more at auctions. All the above halves are selling at higher prices as time goes by, especially if they have superior strike and eye appeal or are a rare variety. This of course can be said of other series also, including Morgan dollars that has many more collectors. Nice strike silver dollars of some years and mints are very rare and sell for 10 times the trends values but are usually private sales. The key to doing well is to know more about the series you collect than the dealers, but never let them know that. I have found some very rare varities in dealers stores and found a 1916-D Murcury dime in a junk box. I also found some very rare medals for $5 each. Tokens and medals are catching on due to their history and more info being available. Hope this helps

Mark asks…

What is the best way to sell a 1990 American Silver Eagle 60 troy ounce coin?

Justin answers:

I answered your question two days ago about what one of these is worth, and I told you then that it is NOT a coin. It is a privately-minted silver round made to look like a silver eagle coin.

Your best bet is to take it at least three dealers or stores that advertise to pay top dollar for gold and silver. Because it is pure silver, it doesn’t need to be melted down and refined like the ‘junk silver’ these places routinely deal in, so they can comfortably give you 95% of the spot market price and charge 105% or more in a quick sale. It doesn’t mean they won’t try to get it for less, but stand firm with them.

The current market price is about $2,320 – less than the price I quoted you two days ago, because silver is lower. You should be able to get close to $2,200.

If you sold it on eBay, you might get a dollar per ounce above the spot price, or $2,380 – $2,400. But the eBay fee is $100 (it’s 9% until you reach $100) and the Paypal fee another 2.9% or about $70. Knock $170 off of $2,380 and you’re not much better than the dealer’s cash in your pocket, and you’re taking all of the risk dealing with strangers, and if you don’t do eBay already, now is a terrible time to start.

George asks…

What should i choose my parents budget is low and i dont what to make it lower help?

umm i have choices should i get a itouch, laptop(under $800), or $100 and does anybody kno of an online catalog of electronic and video games thx

Justin answers:

I am glad you are thinking of your parents budget in your decision. Techonogy is always a bad investment, especially now when most electronics are 6 months out of date when they hit the stores. My suggestion is that you take the $100 and buy some junk silver coins. Watch the economy for three months or so and watch the value of the coins. (They will not go down in value.) The dollar is going to collapse and you might find that that small investment is going to be worth more to you than you can possibly imagine now.
OR
Wait for others to start ditching their “valuables”. Check the local paper for sales and search the yard sales. This is a less glamorous way but you can still get a good value and a decent product.

Don’t take advantage of your parents kindness. Get a side job or sell something of yours of value. Ask yourself if you would even be considering making the purchase if it was YOUR money, and you will probably find the answer is no.

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Your Questions About 10 Golden Rules Of Investing

Robert asks…

How do I run until I’m in shape?

Just trying to get some input now that I’m going to start running to get into shape a shed a few founds. I just want to know how many miles I should start running and how I should gradually increase the distance amount. Also, what tips or techniques can you give me? Such as foods, best time of the day to run, etc. Anything helps

Thanks guys

Justin answers:

For the first week just go out 3 times have a rest day between each run. Run slowly and as far as you can if you need to walk do so. The idea is to enjoy yourself. Go out for no more than 20 minutes at a time. Until you can run for the whole 20 minutes. Then increase your time to 30 minutes. Or add 2 minutes to each run. So you run for 22minutes then 24 and so on. The golden rule don’t add more than 10% at a time. Drink lots of water. Don’t eat anything heavy before you go out, best not too eat for at least an hour before you run. Drink after your run. Running slowly burns more fat than running fast. Change your route often if possible it will help to stop you getting bored. But find a route that you like and every couple of weeks see how much faster you can run it, to see how fitter you are getting. If you decide to keep on running and hopefully you will, invest in a good pair of running shoes. Find your local dealer and tell them you are a beginner and they will help you get the right shoes. Try to find a local running club that will give you lots of encouragement.
Good luck, get out there and have some fun.

Joseph asks…

How do the rich get rich without being born that way.?

unless they invented something or started some big company like pizza hut getting rich today is an impossibility. Really hard work will only get you a great paying job that’s not rich just well off. And all the tools necessary to venture into investments like real estate take tons of cash and unless your born with it your screwed.

Justin answers:

Donald Trump has been bankrupted before yet he always manages to climb the ladder again.

Getting rich is a skill. It involves so much more than just hard work.
My dad has worked hard his entire life. Do you know what he has to show for it? A bad back.

Simple tips:
1. Always save AT LEAST 10% of everything you earn.
2. Invest your savings (stocks, bonds, loaning to others, helping others get businesses started, etc.)
3. Follow the Golden Rule of Investing “Diversify!”
4. Manage your investments.
5. Find experts and get their opinions on investment opportunities.
6. Never risk more than you can afford to lose.
7. No Pain, No Gain.

James asks…

I have $5 taken out of my check each week for my company’s stock plan?

I work for a fortune 500 company and had then deduct $5 each week out of my check. I know this is extremely low but I have no clue how stocks and shares work. Could some tell me should I have them deduct more money and how the money will accumulate?

Justin answers:

Investing in equities is always a good idea in the long run, but investing in just one stock seldom is.
As a rule of thumb i advise people to invest 5-10% of their earnings into diversified retirement savings- and for anyone over 30 just starting, that figure needs to be higher.
The golden rules- start early. Diversify your investments. Stay invested in up and down markets, and take advantage of dollar-cost averaging- which means the same amount invested each week averages out highs and lows in the long run.
For advice, look to your local Primerica representative- google your local office.

Chris asks…

What are some of the strict rules of the Separate Baptist?

Justin answers:

Wow, when I first started going to church I attended a Fundamental Independent Baptist Church; these two types of churches seem similar. When I realized they were not biblical and left the church, I had no friends, and a head full of bad memories. Their practices are legalistic at best, but their belief, which I went on line to read, contradict each other and are scary. An example of the contradictions: Article 3 says, “We believe that man is in a fallen state before God and is unable to liberate himself by any ability he may possess by nature.” Which basically says, Man is bad and cannot come to God by “any” means he possess; therefore, if he’s left to his own devices he will die in his sins. If we compare that with Article 11: “We believe that Jesus Christ, by the Grace of God tasted death for every man, that none can partake of His Holy Divine benefits except by repentance toward God and Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; Infants and the innocent, due to lack of mental ability excepted, they being included in the convenant of God’s Grace.” They spelled covenant wrong. And, what is an “innocent?” That a rhetorical question. No one is innocent according to Article 3. A baby is selfish; that’s its nature. The baby cries when it diaper is wet because it does not like the feeling of a wet diaper. It does not have the capacity to think, my parents are sleeping, and they have to work tomorrow; so, I’ll deal with my diaper until morning. What the church is saying is because these innocents and infants can’t make a choice for Christ they are in a select group of people that are protected and saved. Are they saying, these innocents and infants are part of the elect? Why didn’t they just say that? Because they don’t believe that; they believe in works righteousness. This brings me to their practices, because it is done to earn salvation:
-You can’t drink. I know a pastor who won’t have wine vinegar on his salad because he thinks its sin.
-You can’t dance. (That reminds me of a joke)
-If you miss a service or a time to go door to door and witness the pastor or someone else will make you feel guilty.
-Your tithing will be watched. You’ll be made to feel guilty if you don’t tithe.
-If you know your bible you will not fit in, and you’ll be labeled a trouble maker. You’ll jump from church to church in the same denomination thinking it’s just the pastor who’s too dogmatic. When you visited every church in your area, of like faith, you will have no friends and think you were rejected by God. Finally, you’ll figure the problem wasn’t with the pastors, it was with you.
I know many good intelligent people in those churches. Why are they still there? I’m convinced, and many have said, “All my friends go there, I have too much invested, I’m a deacon or Sunday School teacher, it’s like a social club. We also must remember many of the members are pulling a salary from the church, why would they kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. The others either turn a blind eye, or are ignorant and blissful.

Do not challenge them theologically unless you have time. Most baptist can recite and memorize proof texts like it’s no ones business. If you question their doctrine, only do it on one point at a time and open your bible and read the entire chapter in question. You will find 9 out of 10 times the verse they used, as a proof text, is out of context.

My suggestion to you is not to think twice but think three times.

Ken asks…

does anybody know any real treasure hunting websites?

i need to pay back a 10,000 dollar student loan and im hoping to strike it rich by finding a historic treasure so i can pay back my student laon.

Justin answers:

There are countless T.H.ing websites w/ good info., but I think you should start with the basic cornerstones that treasure hunting of today is built upon. As a student, you should be familiar with researching various subjects. In this case, I’d highly suggest investing in copies of Karl Von Mueller’s Treasure Hunters Manuals numbers 6 & 7. Combined, they represent the BIBLE of serious treasure hunters. READ THEM COVER TO COVER. LEARN FROM THEM. KNOW THEM! The author lets you know that treasure hunting can be done on a shoestring budget, and a metal detector isn’t always needed! However, one of these books contains instructions on how to build a decent (for the time) inexpensive metal detector. Of course, your local libraries should have books on the subject, and best of all: they’re FREE! If you must buy a detector, stay away from Radio Shack crap! Stick w/ Whites, Tesoro, Bounty Hunter, or Fisher brands. Check w/the manufacturers for seasonal deals, then check out auction sites for the used variety. See if you can find a local detector dealer/treasure hunting club–they’re likely to give you lots of useful information.
Research your local areas first. Gas is expensive, & you will be astounded by what can be found in your own back yard! BE AWARE TO BE SAFE! Be aware of areas that may have unexploded shells, uncovered mine shafts/wells, and rotten structures at risk of collapse! DO NOT WALK INTO ANY OLD MINE!
MOST IMPORTANT POINT OF ALL: GET PERMISSION!

Check w/ your local county and state offices to see what laws for or against T. Hunting exist! Get permission from all landowners to detect their property! Learn where it’s illegal! Learn the proper techniques for digging up said treasure. It’s like being a courteous camper; leave no trace that you were ever there! Cover up your holes, pack out any trash you dig up & maybe someones’ trash left in the same area! The hobby/vocation of treasure hunting is very fragile, and we hunters must depend on each other to avoid property damage of all kinds. Please exercise upstanding morals and The Golden Rule. DO UNTO OTHERS! How would you like it if you woke up 1 morning to find your lawn defaced with huge open craters, or your front porch shattered, or (shudder) someone looted your grandfathers’ grave for his gold fillings!

All of the above, and more are dealt with in the books I mentioned (6 & 7) I’d also recommend looking into the magazines Western & Eastern Treasures, & Lost Treasures. GOOD LUCK!

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Your Questions About Investing In Vintage Guitars

Richard asks…

How many of you invest in a guitar ?

Just as you invest in a painting, sculpture, vase, real estate, vintage cars, a Harley, etc,a good quality guitar in good condition will appreciate greatly especially if the tone has seasoned well after the years.

A relic guitar will do the same if it had been used by a well known guitarist.

With the amount of guitars in the market since the early fifties, how many of such guitars qualify to be a good invest?

financi4 answers:

Most guitars of high build quality dating pre-80″s (and even some 80’s) are a good investment assuming that they play well and have all or most of the original parts to them. Be careful though, it’s a lot like real estate, when the market is up, it’s great and when times are tough, well it may be worth holding on to your vintage axe until the market is right again. Personally, I don’t think any guitar is worth more that a couple thousand, no matter what, with the exception that it was Elvis’ or John Lennon’s guitar or something like that, Music comes from the notes you put into it and an old guitar doesn’t make you better, it just makes you a pain in the ass guitar snob who through the powers of suggestion, get people to pay hugely inflated prices on a piece of wood connected to another piece of wood and then has strings on it, I’m mostly talking about electric guitars here though. Acoustics, well they do get better with age – most of them assuming they don’t warp out anywhere and then yes, I can justify paying whatever it takes to get that specific tone. Given that rock music has been a mainstay for 30-40 years now I will be interested to see what collectors find most valuable in the next 20 -30 years. I think solid body Les Paul’s, (a true rock guitar) will be the best bang for the buck as far as investments. My generation (younger) will want to play a Les Paul over a Gretsch Country Gentlemen for example most any day of the week. So ya solid body Gibson is where I would put my coin if I were to collect. I think the older solid body Gibsons will appreciate two fold where the older hollow / semis might be worth only a little more than what they are now. Though a nice older ES335 semi – Man that’s the cat’s meow in my book!

Thomas asks…

What are some good bass guitars for beginners?

So I want to buy a bass guitar – I have no experience with bass so I was just wondering which one I should buy. I have a budget of around £300. Also, can I plug a bass into a normal guitar amp or do I have to buy an amp made for bass?

financi4 answers:

To deal with the amp question first: a guitar amp will produce notes when you play a bass through it, it won’t explode or anything. If that’s what you have, and the budget is tight, it will be OK to use just for learning and practice in your bedroom. Guitar amps, however, are not designed to handle the deeper frequency notes that the bass produces. You won’t get good tone nor very good volume out of one if you’re going to play with a band or in public. So you should invest in a good bass amp as soon as you’re able to.

As far as buying a bass goes, the best thing to do is just go into a guitar shop and hold some in your hands. Some people like big round chunk necks, other people like slim “fast” necks, and so on and so forth. Pick an instrument that feels right in your hands and that you like the look of. It seems superficial, but to be honest, people usually are reluctant to practice an instrument if they hate the look of it.

I’m not sure exactly what brands are available in the UK or how far 300 pounds will go (I’m in the US), but you should definitely try a Yamaha or Squiers in the Vintage Modified or Classic Vibe series (not the Squier Affinity series). The Yamaha RBX374 would be great, or a used BB414. The Peavey Millenium is also pretty good IF you want a super-slim neck.

Steven asks…

Which guitar would be better suited for a beginner?

I’m having a hard time deciding on a guitar for myself (im a beginner) and I was thinking either the Epiphone Les Paul Special 2, or the BC Rich Warlock Red Bevel. Price really isn’t an issue so much as quality and ease of use.
Could someone tell me which one would be a better purchase?

financi4 answers:

“Epiphone is more versatile than BC Rich”. What a crock of nonsense! It sound more like the author of that answer doesn’t like BC Rich.

So, to decide which guitar is better depends on which BC Rich Warlock you’re talking about. From what I can tell, the guitar in question is part of the BC Rich Bronze series with a fixed bridge. It’s junk, so forget it. If you want a BC Rich, the lowest quality Warlock that’s worth playing is the Platinum Series. You can find a good one for a decent price on eBay. It has a tremolo (floating bridge) and it’s a nice guitar. The only thing you might not like about a warlock is that it’s rather pointy if you want to practice sitting down.

That pointiness has never bothered me, however, because I usually noodle laying down on the sofa or practice seriously standing up. All my guitars are pointy – custom Warlock, vintage Flying V, etc. But if you like to practice seriously sitting down, a warlock might drive you crazy unless you are tall and the points don’t hit you in the boobs.

Now, the Les Paul – in your case an Epiphone – is a very chunky ax. Personally, I don’t like the feel of the body because it is thick and I don’t like the bridge because it always feels too high and in the way when I want to palm mute. That’s just my feeling. That doesn’t mean it’s not right for you. Ace Frehley – the master of feedback – has always played a Les Paul. (Whether he can play anything else is … Ahm.., er… No comment!)

One thing I like about both BC Rich and Gibson guitars is that they have a D-shape neck, which is thick and round. It’s easy to rest your thumb on the back of the neck if you want to play fast neoclassical or metal riffs, and you can easily wrap your hand around it if you’re playing rock and use your thumb to fret the lower strings when you’re playing power chords. Vivian Campbell does this a lot if you happen to watch his videos.

That said, the only Epiphone Les Paul worth playing is the Studio Elite . Again, you can look for a good used one on eBay.

The problem with both guitars you have listed is that because they are complete crap, you will disatisfied 6 months from now and you won’t be able to sell either one for what you paid for it. So, you would be much better off to invest a couple hundred more dollars and get a real guitar – one that has decent wood, decent workmanship, will stay in tune, has good sustain, will hold its value over time, and one you will still be happy with it 2 years from now when you can shred like a madman.

A Platinum Series Warlock used will cost you about $400 and the Epiphone Studio Elite about $550. Of the two, I think you get more guitar for your money with the Warlock.

However, if you insist on something cheap, then get a Fender Mexican-made Stratocaster. The workmanship is good and if you test drive a few of them, you will find one with good sustain. Or consider a Yamaha guitar. Even their cheap ones made in Japan are decent. Do NOT get any guitar that’s manufactured in China.

Because you are a beginner, consider purchasing a Marshall Pocket Amp for $40 instead of a bigger amp at this point in your guitar career. You can put a pocket amp anywhere you want to practice and it is surprisingly loud (enough so that someone in the next room will tell you to turn it down). You might want to get a fuzz pedal to go with it and DOD makes some good ones, so get a used fuzz or distortion pedal on eBay. Save your money for a bigger amp after you’ve played a year and have some idea what kind of amp you want. I have a Marshall pocket amp and my pro musician friends think it’s cool.

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Investing $1 Billion For A Better Flu Shot

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The Next 20 Years of Sustainable Investing

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