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Investing In Gold and Silver Foreign Coins, Is It A Smart Thing To Do

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So you have produced the decision to begin investing in gold and silver. Congratulations simply because that’s a extremely wise factor to do right now. Subsequent, you need to determine which precious metals coins, or bullion will make the greatest investment for you. There are so numerous different choices out there and it can be challenging to decide. For valuable metals investment functions, this post is targeted mainly on people residing in the United States.

Numerous individuals think to themselves, “Why not buy some South African Krugerrands, Canadian Maple Leafs, British Sovereigns, French Roosters, Danish Mermaids, and so on.” Boy, doesn’t that audio attractive? It sure does. That’s the stuff of worldwide mystery and intrigue. If you are going to invest in gold and silver, you may as well have some fun with it, correct?

Here are the details. Any numismatic top quality related with foreign gold and silver coins diminishes outdoors the country of origin. So if you purchase some of these sexy foreign coins… when it arrives time to offer them… if you want to get the best price… you are going to have to discover purchasers in the respective countries. Then you are going to have to ship them abroad to the purchaser….and you have the trade rates to deal with, and so on.

In addition foreign coins often have various weights like .2354 troy ounce, and so on. They are almost by no means one full troy ounce and they are seldom stamped with their steel content or purity… but only stamped with the denomination value. Because of to the over elements, foreign coins are a lot more difficult to sell and are of limited worth in an unexpected emergency, financial or or else.

You may be asking yourself “If that is the case, why do so many of those metals dealers/salespeople push them so hard?” You guessed it. They often location greater mark-ups on foreign gold and silver coins so they can make much more revenue on them. In my viewpoint… why hassle? Why consider on the added danger? Why not maintain it simple and just do it the easy and safe way?

In my viewpoint you just cannot go wrong if you stick to the fundamental American Gold Eagle Coins and American Silver Eagle Coins. They are legal tender or forex of the United States, they are minted by the US Mint, they are 99% pure, they are a complete 1 ounce in excess weight and they are 1 of the most acknowledged and taken coins in the globe. No one concerns their worth or authenticity. Gold American Eagle coins and Silver American Eagle coins are easy to purchase and easy to sell. Would You Like To Buy All the Gold and Silver You Want — at Wholesale?

I have found the ONLY location in the world that exactly where the average person can purchase all of the precious metals they want, at wholesale. In this private membership club, typical individuals can now buy valuable metals at the exact same cost, or even better prices, than many preferred dealers spend. Members conserve up to 21% to 35% or much more, and you don’t even need a bullion dealer’s license to do it. Grab a free copy of my new Ebook, “Insider’s Guide To Buying Gold and Silver At Wholesale” and discover how you can start having to pay wholesale these days:

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Your Questions About Investing In Mutual Funds

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Chris asks…

I am 21yr old software engineer earning Rs22,000 pm.I want to start investing in mutual funds.?

I have few questions regarding this.
1.Which one should I opt between Equity and Debt mutual funds?
2.Should I go for short-term investments or long-term investments?
3.MIPs or SIPs?

financi4 answers:

Answer to your question is as follows:

1.Which one should I opt between Equity and Debt mutual funds?

Investment in equity or debt is considered this way
Investment in Equity = 100 – your current age
so as you said your current age is 21 so investment in equity will be 100-21= 79% in Equity and 21% in debt.

2.Should I go for short-term investments or long-term investments?
It completely depend on you the kind of responsibilities you have in your life, considering no financial responsibilities at present in your life can think of going for long term investment

3.MIPs or SIPs?

MIP mainly are products which invest 80% in debt and 20% in Equity.
Considering your age it is not advisable to invest in MIP

SIP means systematic investment plan

…it is a method of investing a fixed sum, at a regular interval, in a mutual fund.
It is very similar to monthly saving schemes like a recurring monthly deposit / post office deposit

Advantages of Systematic Investment Planning

Encourages Regular Investments (just like recurring deposit
schemes)

A Convenient way to invest regularly
Lower initial investment without cutting into regular expense
Long term perspective
Rupee Cost Averaging Benefit to counter volatility – it brings down
the average cost of your Investments
No timing the market!!!
Meet investment objective with investment needs

http://mutual-funds-personalfin.blogspot.com/2010/08/systematic-investment-plan-sip.html

Donald asks…

I need to open roth ira account and will be investing in mutual funds. Firsttrade or scottrade?

After doing a lot of research I have narrowed down to firsttrade or scottrade. Which one would you suggest? Mostly I will be investing in mutual funds (Vanguard funds), sometimes stocks.
I don’t want to open with Vanguard because then I have to only buy their funds in future. They also have min requirements and other fees.

financi4 answers:

Scottrade has a pretty decent reputation and their mutual fund trading fees are among the lowest I have seen. Firsttrade is a new one to me. I have never heard of them. My IRA accounts are with TD Ameritrade, and they have proved reliable. Their fees are higher than Scottrade however.

Here is a thought. You can have as many IRA accounts with as many different mutual fund companies and stock brokers as you desire. The only stipulation is that you can not contribute more than $4000 a year. You can even move them from place to place although the broker you are moving from will likely charge you a fee for the move.

Joseph asks…

How do I start investing in Mutual funds in the Philippines?

Thank you very much for the answers!
They are very helpful!
Godbless!

financi4 answers:

Go to the website www.icap.com.ph

Investment Company Association of the
Philippines’ website

then select the top three performers based
on the 2007 year to date growth.

You might also want to invest in a variable universal life ( a product of Philamlife ). In a 12 month period ( June 2006 to June 2007 ), a 70+ percent growth in investment was recorded. If you need more info on this product, send me an e-mail.

Steven asks…

How does investing in real estate compares to investing in mutual funds?

I have $2,600 of monthly disposable income. I could buy a multifamily every year for a few years with a 10% down or I could put all of it in my 401k at work. What should I do? I don’t mind being a landlord and the work it entails as long as the returns are higher and worth the effort. Also, how much should I expect for a multifamily to appreciate if I keep it for 30 years.

financi4 answers:

If you’re close to retirement age (within 10-12 years), play it safe and go 401K. If you have time to get into real estate, go with the multifamily. Thirty years ago, home values were about a quarter of where they right now. So a $300K multifamily should be worth at least 1 million by 2038. Also, investing in property gives you the flexibility to take out equity later to leverage more properties. In a 401K, your money’s tied up, held in place from the fear of early penalties…

William asks…

What institution should a person begin investing in mutual funds?

Should it be with a brokerage, fund company or bank?

financi4 answers:

You don’t need a brokerage account unless you’re going to buy individual securities (stocks, ETFs, bonds, etc.). If you want to invest in mutual funds, go direct with a good no-load fund company (Vanguard, T. Rowe Price, Dodge & Cox, etc.). A bank is NOT the place to go.

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Your Questions About Purpose Of Investing Money

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George asks…

Can i have a raffle and donate the money to my own business?

I’m an Idependant Business Owner and I’m running low on funds. I have a few items kept that i can raffle off, i know raffling to gain personal profit is wrong but would it be if your investing the money into a your own business.

Justin answers:

It is considered to be a type of gambling in many states. It may not produce a profit for business purposes. Churches and charity organizations may do it though.

Thomas asks…

Can u suggest me the best book or reference site for Forex?

I am planning to invest my money in forex. Before i do so, i would like to learn the basics in forex trading. For this purpose i need few books or may be some reference site to get a detailed knowledge about foreign exchange.

Justin answers:

There are several websites that allow you to learn the basics for free. I’ll let my favorite free websites on the sources.

Good luck.

Charles asks…

Does the government check how much is in a person’s bank account for tax season/purposes?

What about if a person invests money in financial institutions such as Charles Schwab/Morgan Stanley? Does the government also know how much are in those accounts or do they only require reporting transactions (buy and sell)?

Justin answers:

Not exactly, but the bank and brokers report the income you earned to the IRS.

Daniel asks…

What are the best brands of boxing glove?

Hi all, I do a fair amount of boxing training (4 times a week) but when I first started I bought some cheap gloves for training and eventually they ended up ripping and I keep having the same problem that all the cheap gloves I used fall to pieces after a month or sometimes after a few weeks of use and I really enjoy boxing and am looking to invest some money into buying a nice pair of gloves that will last a long time and that can be used for all training purposed (bag work, pad work and sparring) I have seen a nice pair of red Rival gloves 18oz for £80 do you think they will do the job or should I be looking at something else? Thanks for any help.

Justin answers:

I like Everlast…

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Your Questions About Investing In Silver

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Thomas asks…

Investing in Silver Bullion?

Suppose I wanted to invest in silver bullion, partially as a serious investment, partially for the novelty of having some “portable property”.

Suppose I went to a coin dealer and bought several silver 1oz pieces, or a large bar, would I be able to sell them later without excess testing and fees? Assuming that I took and kept possession of the bar(s) to avoid storage fees.

What I mean is when I go to sell the bars (back to a dealer) will the process be: “Your bars have the right mass, here is your money”. Or will it be more convoluted?

I’ve heard stories about a person who took his bars in, and had to pay for the dealer to drill holes in bars to ensure that the bar hadn’t been hollowed out and filled with a cheaper metal.

What is a typical pathway from purchase to sale of a bar of silver?

Justin answers:

If I took one of my bars in to a coin shop to sell, and they wanted to drill in hole in my J/M serialized bar – I would give them a piece of my mind (loudly) and leave!

You should have NO problem selling them as long as they are a known refiner / assayer.

As far as the fees – thats a different matter. I have only bought from a coin store, never sold to them. Always sell to individuals – as they should atleast pay spot price (if price is in down trend) or more then spot if price is in uptrend. I doubt a coin shop will pay over spot price, as they can get it AT spot price or just a tiny bit over, and thats thier worst case scenario.

And along the same lines. SHOP AROUND – can’t stress that enough. I found that coin shops in my area had very noticable price differences for the same thing – call each coin shop one morning, and ask for the price of a 10oz .999 silver bar. Go visit the lowest 3 or 4 prices you get – (visit with empty pockets) just a get the feel of the place and see if you like who you’ll be giving your money too.

I should also say (since you asked), take it with you! DO NOT pay for storage – its no good if you can’t get to it when/if you need it. Also, any fees over time will eat up some profit you will make if the price goes up, and it will add to the lose if the price goes down.

If its just an investment, buy in on a physical ‘pool’, like at kitco.com. Its about 1/3 the way down on this page:
https://online.kitco.com/sellprice/selling.html
I only mention this as an option. Personally, I would suggest getting physical if your interested in it.

Last but not least – If you do decide to purchase some silver from a local coin shop – PAY IN CASH!! No credit cards, no debit cards, no checks, no names, no nothing – just pay, say thanks and leave.

Good luck!

Edited:
“Nobody buys the actual metal as an investment anymore.”
Nobody??? Really??? Check E-bay – find a .999 silver “anything” that sells for less then spot price. 1000’s of oz.’s per week are sold on E-bay at what I consider high prices, especially when you take shipping into consideration.

John asks…

where can i buy silver coins or bars for a good price?

I want to start investing in silver and gold [the dollar is too cheap to buy gold for a good price ATM] so where is the best place to get a deal on silver

Justin answers:

Here is a good option.

Daniel asks…

..Investing in Silver?

I want to invest in silver, and since you cant invest in silver (actual metal) directly through the stock market, how or what is the best way to invest in silver? If there is a company which will definitely go up when silver goes up then please tell me.

Justin answers:

The easiest, cheapest, secure way is the ETF: SLV

SLV is the largest holder (in a vault) in the world of silver.

Joseph asks…

Investing In Silver Bullion?

I’m starting to put a few dollars of my income into silver bullion and i have a few questions.
Are silver rounds better to buy than silver bars?
When does a person sell their silver?
What places around the house can you store your bullion (hidding spot)?
What’s the best amount with the least premium (1 ,5 ,10 ,50 , 100 oz)?

Justin answers:

It’s nuts to pay the high fees/commisions (hidden and not hidden) of buying silver bullion… Plus shipping &/or storage costs. The largest deposit of silver in the world is with the ETF “SLV”. Use your on-line broker and your total commisions will be between $1 and $25 (depending on your broker)….

If you don’t have a broker…. Why would you start with silver? Commodities are really best bought/sold by experianced investors or traders. Always invest only in things you totally understand!

David asks…

Would you invest in silver through the stock market or in physical coins?

I am wanting to invest in silver and wonder if it would be better to invest in the stock market with a company who holds silver or to buy actual coins and bars?
To declining price of silver
Yes but still is went from $15 to $30 an ounce so far this year….and as the federal reserve prints more money the price of precious metals seems to be sky rocketing.

Justin answers:

The really smart people don’t invest, they trade. They buy on price declines and sell on the upswings, and they do it over and over. Historically, silver has been prone to huge movements up and down. It may still have some room to go up, but the easy money has been made in this recent bull market. Anyone who bought in the last year at around $15 ought to lock those profits in and buy again on the next big correction. Some think it’s going to $40 in ’11, and it might, but others think it’s a bubble waiting to burst and it could be back down to $10 in a very short time, and it might. That’s why investing, to hold, is not a good idea with metals. You trade it, keep your money moving.

This can be done with paper trading or physical silver. I prefer physical silver, because I don’t trust the paper-shufflers, I hate paperwork and record-keeping in general, and I know how to buy physical silver for below spot market in coin or collectible silver round form. Often, sellers don’t know exactly what they have, or buyers I compete against don’t know exactly what they’re looking at. I search the auctions and buy the ones that ‘slip through the cracks’. I went to an estate auction a few weeks ago, spent an hour so of my time. I watched people overpay for common silver dimes ($2.50 apiece in bag lots of 50 coins, plus a 10% buyer’s fee) because they all knew that silver is hot, and walked away with the best lot in the auction, a grouping of odd collector medals and world coins that nobody knew the weights of the silver, for less than half of spot price. More fun than trading paper, too.

Ken asks…

Is it a good idea to invest on silver coins or bullion?

I bought a canadian silver maple leaf coin at a coin shop. The owner sold it to me for 40$ instead of 45$. Do you think it’s a good idea for me to invest on silver coins and bullion even after the price of silver has dropped?

Justin answers:

Sounds like you got taken by the coin shop, silver spot is only at $31 per ounce, at my local coin shop you can buy canadian maple leaf coins for about $2.75 over spot. That means I could by the same coin for 33.75. You can also get them on ebay for like 33.50. I only invest in bullion because I really don’t care about the coin just the silver. The answer is yes because everyone needs a diversified portfolio of investments including precious metals.

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Smart Beta Investing Now More Attractive To Pension Funds?

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Smart Beta Investing Now More Attractive To Pension Funds?

Some people in the industry are speculating that pension funds may be attracted to use smart beta as a new technique in investing to boost their returns as equity markets continue to rise while staying away from asset classes that are costly and volatile.
See all stories on this topic »

ValueWalk
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Your Questions About Storing Junk Silver Coins

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James asks…

Any good places to find or buy junk silver coins?

I’m looking for junk silver in quarters, dimes, and copper pennies. Here’s some places I have already and let me know if you have other suggestions, thanks.

Grocery store change
Banks
Laundry mat business
Coin collectors
website mint companies

Justin answers:

Well, what are you looking to pay, face value or the going rate?

For face value, you can try going through your change or sorting through bank rolls. This isn’t going to yield much. With high prices back in the news again like 1980-91, the average person is paying a lot more attention to their change. Sorting of bank rolls has picked up.

Unless you own the laundromat. Good luck finding an ignorant owner who doesn’t know about silver coins.

As for collectors, they expect to get near ‘melt’. Websites charge a premium above ‘melt’.

So, what are you willing to pay? I’d be happy to unload my stash of ‘junk’ silver for $23 an ounce.

Ken asks…

Is it ok to polish old ‘junk silver’ coins or does doing that somehow take away some of its value?

Cleaning to me is no big deal cause I am thinking that them being 90% silver the value comes from the ‘silver content’ as opposed to having ‘historical’ value from the natural old circulated look. So do I clean or not clean? I tend to like thing looking shiny and new. Thanks.

Justin answers:

Well, they’re your coins. If you want to polish them, you can, but it will kill any numismatic value they might have (even “junk” silver coins can have some numismatic value in some cases).

You should know that even if they look “shiny”, they won’t look “new”. They’ll still have the wear they had before you polished them. And unless you’re able to store them so that they don’t come in contact with any sort of contaminant, they’ll just start toning again–and the toning on a worn coin that’s been polished usually looks worse than one that hasn’t been polished.

Joseph asks…

Morgan silver dollars, 1881, set of 20, in excellent condition, what are they worth?

I have been given a set of these coins. I know nothing about old coins. I would like to know what they are worth and where I can sell them to get the most out of them. Any infor would be appreciated.

Justin answers:

I can tell you that the first and foremost factor in value is rarity, followed immediately by condition.

Factors that affect rarity are how many were minted, what mintmark it is, any minting oddities, and again, its condition. (ie: there are fewer in perfect condition than in abused condition, making the better ones more valuable due to numbers alone)

Factors that affect condition are: dings, dents, scratches, gouges, weathering, cleaning, damage by environment, fingerprints, and toning. Try not to handle them other than by the edges, and dont slide them across any countertops or tables. Handle them gently, every nick costs the seller money.

Cleaning is THE single worst thing a person can do to a coin. Dont do it. Leave it exactly like it is. Let an expert determine what it needs, if anything.

History has been hard on coins, keep in mind that this coin is 125+ yrs old and was carried across the western front in trunks, pockets of cowboys, settlers, hidden in log cabins for years, traded, thrown in the cash register with other coins, buried for years, and slammed on counters of stores and bars for decades.

I wont bore you with the professional grading scale, but it starts with junk value at the bottom, and escalates to mint purely perfect “as minted” condition at the top, or MS70 (mint state 70)

A roll of 20 of them in junk condition will sell for 20x the value of silver, per oz.

A roll of 20 of them in mint, undamaged, perfect condition, will sell for much more.

George asks…

how is silver refined? what is the process and time involved?

looking for oldfashioned method. not a newer auto machine that does it.

Justin answers:

Silver is currently about 1/60th the price of gold by weight, and approximately 70 times more valuable than copper. Silver did once trade at 1/6th to 1/7th the price of gold, prior to the Age of Discovery and the finding of large silver deposits in the Americas. Over the last 100 years the price of silver and the gold/silver ratio has fluctuated greatly due to competing industrial and store of value demands. In 1980 the silver price rose to an all-time high of $49.45 per troy ounce. In December 2001 the silver price was $4.15 per ounce, and in April 2006 it had risen to $12.00 per ounce.
For over four thousand years silver has been regarded as a form of money and store of value. However, since the end of the silver standard, silver has lost its role as a common form of currency.
A traditional way of investing in silver is by buying bullion bars. In some countries, like Switzerland and Liechtenstein, bullion bars can be bought or sold over the counter of the major banks. Most investors would not recommend storing large quantities of bullion oneself (e.g. In one’s home or buried in the garden) but to use a bank or dealer. Other than storing silver in one’s own safe deposit box at a bank, silver can be placed in allocated (also known as non-fungible), or unallocated (fungible or pooled) storage with a bank or dealer.
Buying bullion silver coins or “rounds” is another popular method of physically holding silver. Some hard money enthusiatists use 99.9% “fine” silver rounds (see Liberty Dollar) or even 99.99% pure silver coins (see Canadian Silver Maple Leaf, for example) as currency. Coins may be minted as either fine silver or junk silver, the latter being older coins with a smaller percentage of silver than 99.9% pure silver e.g. U.S. Pre-1965 dimes and quarters are 90% silver. Junk silver coins are also available as sterling silver coins, which were officially minted until 1919 in the United Kingdom and 1945 in Australia. These coins are 92.5% silver, and are in the form of (in decreasing weight) Crowns, Half-crowns, Florins, Shillings, Sixpences, and threepence. The tiny threepence weighs 1.41 grams, and the Crowns are 28.27 grams (1.54 grams heavier than a US $1).
A certificate of ownership can be held by silver investors instead of storing the actual silver bullion. Silver certificates allow investors to buy and sell the security without the hassles associated with the transfer of actual physical silver. The Perth Mint Certificate Program (PMCP) is the only government guaranteed silver certificate program in the world.
Futures based on silver currently trade on various exchanges around the world. In the US this occurs primarily on COMEX (Commodity Exchange) which is a subsidiary of the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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10 Questions About Investing In Index Funds: An Interview With …

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10 Questions About Investing In Index Funds: An Interview With …

Investors should choose index funds over actively managed funds, argues Hebner.
Minyanville.com – All Articles

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