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Your Questions About Invest In Gold Stock

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Charles asks…

I recently invested in some gold coins , I’d like to know how to watch the price of Gold on the stock exchange

Is there a stock symbal I should know for the Gold market ?

financi4 answers:

Gold is a commmodity not a stock. It is traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange (called NYMEX) and on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Exchange traded commodities include things like pork belly futures, crude oil, copper, platinum, coal etc.

In the commodities trade there is the spot (ie immediate delivery like when you buy gas at the gas station) and the future markets wen you agree to deliver your gold at certain date in the future. The per barrel price of oil that we hear so much about is actually the current NYMEX rate for a barrell (55 gallons) of light sweet crude oil to be delivered in 30 days.

Gold traded on the markets is not usually in coin form it is in bullion or other unfinished state. Coins are generally not solid all the way through so they may not be marketable on the comodities market. If fact they are probably more valuable to coin collectors than anywhere else so you should probably watch the coin trade publications.

William asks…

if you had 500$..which company stock will you invest in yamana gold(AUY) or braskem(BAK)?

please give a reason for your answer…thanx

financi4 answers:

Neither one…I used to be a huge fan of mining stocks. After getting burned for quite awhile, I realized that physically owning precious metals is much better than owning shares of a mine. Many of these companies have had a long history of shorting investors (google it…fascinating history), and very rarely do you see a mining company pay a decent dividend. This lack of dividends mixed with the political instability most of these mining operations have to deal with (digging in third world countries is no fun!) make a poor investment. I look at it like this…the more layers of people that exist between myself and my assets, the less my return will be. Gold ETFs are a prime example of this. If you want a good return, get into value investing and read about Warren Buffet. If you want to store your money in a precious metal, physically own it. Gold is a tremendous hedge against inflation. For long term investing, value plays and strong dividends are where it’s at. I hope this helps!

Ken asks…

What’s the best book you have ever read on investing?

I don’t exclusively refer to stock investing. We can invest in gold, stamps, fund, stocks, real estate, start-up,foreign currency, etc. I need a good book that educates a person to be a good investor, not particularly in stock market.

financi4 answers:

Instead of reading a book, read the Motley Fool Mechanical Investing Forum. Books pretty much give you only vague theories; it’s been documented that not even Buffett always does everything he’s said publicly.

On the forum they not only give out their theories, they also test them and show what the returns have been over time.

Mark asks…

how i can invest in kuwait and us market share and gold etfs.if seting in india?

how i can invest in kuwait and us stock markets companies,gold etfs and other metals.if i siting in india and can i invest by indian brokers.if i cannot todo tell how can i invest in .thanks

financi4 answers:

Well from India you can trade in US and some European markets, in order to do so you have to ask for “Overseas Trading A/c” from you broker.

But if you want to trade in Dow Jones or S&P 500 then you can do the same by trading in NSE via broker and that too during Indian market timings.
You can also buy Gold ETF on NSE and BSE.

Thomas asks…

one should invest in gold or realty or stocks at this stage?

financi4 answers:

Gold — too much of fluctuation now a days.Ok for long term
realty—- in shambles. Still trend down. Wait for an year or so till it goes to rock bottom.
Stocks —- enter and exit before budget.

Ok?

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How to Handle the Dangers of DIY Investing – DailyFinance

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How to Handle the Dangers of DIY Investing – DailyFinance

Wall Street wants you to believe that you need professional help to manage your money, but most investors prefer to go it alone. And you, can, if you dodge
www.dailyfinance.com/2013/05/04/diy-investing-dangers/

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The truth behind 50 stock market rules of thumb

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The truth behind 50 stock market rules of thumb

His buy low and sell high strategy is a pretty common investing phrase, but to apply it in the face of that sort of environment takes acumen, independent thinking and conviction. Stock Market Rules (McGraw Hill $27.95), now in its fourth edition, takes
See all stories on this topic »

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PIMCO Total Return ETF Manager Gross Offers 5 Investing Tips

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PIMCO Total Return ETF Manager Gross Offers 5 Investing Tips

For the exchange traded fund investors who are reluctant to just sit idly by while the government hikes up taxes and diminishes overall wealth, PIMCO's resident bond guru, Bill Gross, suggests a couple of steps to hedge the pending wealth tax.
See all stories on this topic »

ETF Trends
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Your Questions About Disadvantages Of Gold Investment

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George asks…

Purdue Economics or IU Finance?

Currently I am a rising junior in high school and am starting to think about college. I know I want to do something in finance or economics, but I’m not sure which school to go to. I’ve been thinking about IB and sales and trading. I love the stock market and the idea of trading so I lean toward sales and trading, but I don’t want to limit my later exit opportunities. I live in Indiana so I will probably either attend IU or Purdue. I will qualify for the IU Distinction scholarships so I would graduate debt free. Also, I know IU has a unique Investment Banking and Capital Markets Workshop that can expose me to internships, leading opportunities and potential employers. Now this all sounds great and I’m set to go, but there’s one thing: I bleed gold and black. My parents went to Purdue and I am a huge fan of all their sports teams. However, I don’t know if Purdue can offer all of the opportunities that IU can, particularly in the NYC market (took a trip there and now can’t imagine living anywhere else). IU offers a finance major and Purdue Economics, both of which I would double with accounting. So I guess my question is, could Purdue offer me the same opportunities that IU could for my career? Could I go to Purdue and succeed in S&T or would I be at a severe disadvantage. In the end, I guess I would be able to plug my nose and go to IU (kidding), but my first choice without career implications is easily Purdue. IU campus is great, so that is not a factor either. Thanks for reading this and thank you for your input!

Justin answers:

It is going to be difficult to land a position as an Investment Bank Financial Analyst with an undergraduate degree from either Purdue or Indiana U. Investment Banks for the most part tend to recruit at more highly selective campuses. Ivy Leagues and universities like Chicago and Northwestern in the Midwest and Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, Duke, Amherst, Swarthmore, Wesleyan, Bucknell etc. These are mostly two year positions where the expectation is to then enter a top tier MBA program. It is with the Finance MBA that a student then is hired into the six figure Investment Banking Associate positions. Economics is the preferred major as opposed to Finance. Most top tier Business Schools don’t even offer undergrad Business degrees and do not prefer applicants with undergrad Business degrees. It is seen as too narrow a focus. An Economics BA degree teaches the big picture and is complemented by a Finance MBA. At Purdue, an Engineering degree supplemented by Intermediate Macro and Micro Econ and maybe a Money and Banking class as well as Financial Accounting would give a better chance of being hired as an IB Financial Analyst than an Economics degree. (Intermediate Micro and Macro Econ Theory classes are the most important classes in any Econ major.) After all, Purdue is known for Engineering and Ivy Leagues with the exception of Cornell, are typically weak in Engineering. A good portion of Ivy Leaguers competing for these positions have Economics degrees. Purdue however is also known for a very low degree of grade inflation.
Http://www.gradeinflation.com/
http://www.cfainstitute.org/cfaprogram/pages/index.aspx
If financing college is an issue and your family makes too much income for an ivy league/highly selective private university education to be low cost or free….
Http://news.yale.edu/2008/01/14/yale-cuts-costs-families-and-students
….and you are a varsity athlete, then, might want to consider a service academy or an Nrotc/Rotc/Afrotc scholarship.
Http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylv=3?qid=20120125193024AA11LUr
This can be a good track into a top tier MBA program as Business Schools value the leadership of military officers. The pay is also fairly good when the tax free housing allowance, BAH, is included. O-1 to O-2 in 24 months. O-2 to O-3 in another 24 months. BAH varies with location.
Http://militarypay.defense.gov/mpcalcs/Calculators/RMC.aspx
http://haas.campusgroups.com/veterans/alumni/
http://www.career-satisfaction.army.mil/wp_branch_slides.html
http://i46.tinypic.com/2vmzon6.jpg
Good Luck!

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This Venn Diagram Shows Why Startup Investing Is – Business Insider

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This Venn Diagram Shows Why Startup Investing Is – Business Insider

"The most successful founders tend to work on ideas that few beside them realize are good."
SAI

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Your Questions About Summary Of Stock Market Indexes

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Chris asks…

Is this a reasonable investment stategy?

I’m just tossing around ideas. Here is my idea. We all know the market goes up and down in cycles. Let’s use indexed mutual funds as our investment vehicle to take out the variable of picking the “right” stocks or bond type. This is not a lump sum strategy. Every month we have $1K to invest which is increases w/ inflation each yr ($1K + $30 next yr assuming 3%). During bullish yrs, we invest new $ as follows: 70% bonds 30% stocks. Every 6 months during a bull run, we pull 5% off the table from stocks and place into a bonds. When bull run ends, we take sell our bond holdings and slowly buy back into the stock market. New money spread will be 70% stocks & 30% bonds. It’s just an idea. No need to flame me if it’s horrible. What’s do you think of it.

Justin answers:

I think your strategy is fine. It’s quite conservative and seems to be far more structured towards the protection of principle rather than principle growth. Bonds are not the oppossite of stocks so you aren’t hedging your portfolio but diversifying. You probably can’t buy at the bottom so you are employing a dollar cost averaging strategy which is sound and although not really judged to be superior to lump sum investing is what you are choosing.

In summary there are different strategies which would increase your return but that doesn’t appear to be your objective. If the returns are acceptable to you and you sleep at night. Then carry on with the knowledge that you are accomplishing your goals. I would love to know the long term outcome of this strategy.

Good Luck.

Robert asks…

How do I get yahoo to mend their quotes?

There is supposedly a “report an issue” link on the quotes page at the bottom, but all that does is lead me here. Meanwhile pretty much all, if not ALL, FTSE 100 components are displaying incorrect daily ranges and day lows. Where on earth and the internet should I report this?

Justin answers:

Hi Stuart,

I’m not able to replicate any issues with our ^FTSE data at this time. We’re currently matching the data being displayed on the London Stock Exchange:

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/exchange/prices-and-markets/stocks/indices/summary/summary-indices.html?index=UKX

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=^FTSE

If I’m missing something, or if this issue seems to be temporary, please create another question with details with links to any data you find inaccurate.

Thanks.

– Oscar

Mark asks…

Are there any stock market liquidity indicators for the UK (and Eurozone)?

I am doing a project to analyse investors expectations. I want to know if there some indicators that measure liquidity and what these indicators can tell us about investors expectations. The focus needs to be on UK financial markets, along with the Eurozone. Any help would be appreciated thanks.

Justin answers:

1. Trading volumes is one of the liquidity indicators.

2. Such information for individual stocks and for indexes is available on the websites of stock exchanges. Information is also available in Financial/Economic newspapers.

3. For example, the Secondary Market Statistics of London Stock Exchange contains summary order book and total trading volumes, with further analysis of order book trading by day/month and by index/business sector.

4. For details, please see at:

http://www.londonstockexchange.com/statistics/trading/trading.htm

..

Ken asks…

In Yahoo Finance TV Widget, how do you add the Dow Jones Industrial Average under Market Summary?

Mine only shows the NASDAQ and NY Composite Index. Please give detailed instructions. Thanks, Bob

Justin answers:

Not sure if this will work, as others are complaining about the widget not working.

This has been suggested from the Yahoo Widget community about the widget::
Use ^DJX. It’s 1/100 Dow Jones Industrial.
Http://widgets.yahoo.com/widgets/yahoo-stock-ticker/csort/helpful

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